Recommendation?

To Recommend or not? This is one of the most difficult questions we face. If we pick on Duke we may Mislead some to think another Medical Center is better. However, we now have sworn testimony from some of the Doctors at Duke. We believe this is very much like the attitudes of other Doctors  in North Carolina and across the nation.

Based on this testimony, We Can Not Recommend any Doctor that makes no attempt to diagnose an illness that may involve MCS

Part of North Carolina Chemical Injury Networks By laws reads:"No Medical Professional will knowingly be recommended who ignores, fails to refer a patient to a recognized expert or treats the chemically injured patient as a controversial subject. ("All in your head" is not a diagnosis).

It is our opinion that when symptoms wax and wane --- Chemical Sensitivity must be considered at least a part of the patients health problem.

It is clear that Multiple Chemical Sensitivity / EI and Sick Building Syndrome is a highly controversial Illness and In North Carolina MCS is about as controversial as any state in the country.

We have some members that have received an accurate diagnosis. Some have been unable to even get a diagnosis at Duke. We have some Chemically Injured that have a firm diagnosis from Doctors in another part of the State or Country and find Doctors at Duke are more than happy to testify against them at their Workers Compensation Hearing.

If we have an illness that is in fact caused by chemicals we expect our Doctor to diagnose our illness and be willing to put it in writing.

The following is taken from AOEM Web Site. Duke is proud of their OEM Clinic. They are  proud of their Customers which include:

~Site work with many local employers including,
Glaxo - Wellcome,
EPA,
NIEHS,
Bristol Meyers,
Mitsubishi Semiconductor,
Collins and Aikman,
Reichhold Chemical, Inc. 

These are very large companies and include one chemical company and 2 Drug Manufacturing companies. Our Question is, can they be the "Company Doctor" one day and your personal Doctor the Next.

Note: in the diagnosis mentioned in the links below, MCS and Tight Building Syndrome are not mentioned on Duke OEM Web Page. If they were as proud of their ability and willingness to provide a diagnosis for MCS as they are of their large company customers they would at list MCS as a diagnosis.

Approximately 60-70% of AOEM Clinics are willing to state publicly that they diagnose or evaluate MCS or Tight Building Syndrome, About 30-40 percent of AOEM Clinics are not willing to state that they diagnose or evaluate MCS. Duke OEM does not.



Go to the AOEC Clinic Directory
Link to AOEC
Link to OEM